Chicago PD (S3E16): “The Cases That Need To Be Solved”

 

Review:
“The Cases That Need To Be Solved” follows the investigation of a young boy’s execution in a quite alley. The case becomes the priority for every officer and no one is left out of the investigation process. Through research into the parents, the murder appears to be a retaliation of a gang. However, the victims father claims he’s been out of his gang since his son’s birth six years prior. Ultimately, it is discovered that revenge was taken on the wrong person, and therefore, the young child should never have been killed in the first place. The episode ends emotionally as all the police officers and community members gather at a candlelight vigil in honor of the victim.
This week’s episode of Chicago PD handled difficult topics elegantly. It has gone down as the episode a majority of cast and crew members are most proud of. The cast should be overjoyed by their guest stars who brought the message of the episode to new levels with their acting. 
The performance of Tiffany Renee Johnson and Ser’Darius Blain, guest staring as the victims parents, was a shinning moment of last nights episode. They brought raw emotions to screen and helped immensely with the portrayal of the impactful message of the episode — that black lives matter and no young child should experience such violence. It is not often guest stars hold such a presence on a show, but last night, their performance topped the others.  
Another highlight of the episode were two scenes between Antonio and his son, who appears to be just a few years older than the victim. These scenes bring insight into any viewer’s life and highlight the preciousness of life and those around us. Jon Seda did a fantastic job portraying a father emotionally unsettled by the case at hand and the idea of losing his son in the same manner.
Chicago PD also brings an interesting perspective on police brutality, looking at it from the eyes of police officers themselves, largely with which are white. In a conversation between Platt, Burgess, and Roman, the comment is made that it’s crazy how the deaths in Chicago have decreased immensely, yet people are increasingly angry at the police for doing their job. The major factor in this argument is what is considered police brutality opposed to what is necessary to get information from suspects. I have noticed though Chicago PD a variation of what is prescribed okay and what crosses the line as unprofessional  — and how my definition of such differs from the officers. Some suspects are physically hurt in order to push them to give the detectives information and others don’t need this pressure. With this being a highly disputed and controversial topic, it was refreshing to see Chicago PD take on the challenge of bringing it to the screen as that is what TV is for – to entertain while educating and to shine a line on social issues.
Overall, this episode was among the best of the series. I hope to see Chicago PD tackle equally tragic stories in need of being told in the future.